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el Gato Gordo View Drop Down
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    Posted: 24 Jan 2017 at 9:28am
I have a passenger train and one intermodal freight train that lack end of train lights.  The passenger train is the Fleischmann set 734077, SBB, Doppelstockwagen.  The cars are currently unlighted, which, I imagine, can be corrected with the appropriate lighting kit.  But the last car, no doubt, should have tail lights, right?  I wonder how this could be done?

Secondly, the freight consist.  What sort of trailing - end of train - lights are used on freight trains, and specifically on intermodal cars, in Germany?  And how might I achieve that?

Thanks, and cheers!
Gordon
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Railwriter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jan 2017 at 11:08am
Gordon,

There was a previous thread about this (that I started) some time ago.  But I could not find it immediately.

Several manufacturers offer LED end of train light kits.  Though most are intended for HO, I think some would also fit in N scale.  I am considering one made by ESU.


(Go to the main ESU page, then select "accessories" and you will also see some interior lighting kits that supposedly also work for N scale -- that include end of train lights.)

Some of these kits do not include track pickup.  So, for a passenger car, the best way would be to start with a (scale and manufacturer appropriate) car lighting kit, that has the track pickups.  

You would want a kit with a built-in capacitor that keeps the light from flickering when the car passes over areas where the electrical pickup is not perfect.


Regarding freight trains:  The end of train light would be hung from the back of the last car.  Depending on the era and country, this would either be a solid red light or a flashing red light.

I was able to buy (used on eBay) an HO Roco freight car that has the flashing red light built in and that has wheel pickups already installed.  This was apparently a Roco Club model some years ago.  My understanding is that the wheels pickup and inside electronics (a boxcar) were made by Weinert, though I have not been able to find the same equipment by itself from European dealers that carry Weinert products.

I have an American made flashing end of train light that I bought when a local hobby shop closed down.  I no longer have the packaging, so I don't remember who makes it, but you could probably find something similar from Walthers.  The one I have works off a 9 volt battery, which is probably too large for N.  But I assume you could find a smaller battery that would still work.

I plan to install it in an intermodal car carrying a large trailer.  The battery should fit, and the thin black wires to the back of the car would not be too obvious.  Tn this case the "tarp" top of the trailer lifts off, making it easy to access the battery and the switch that turns the flashing light on and off.  A smaller battery might fit inside an N container.  Or, you could try to find a wheel pickup set for N cars.  In the latter case, I would make sure the last car has four axles, not two.  A wheel pickup set for four axle passenger cars would probably also work for four axle freight cars.

Again, if there are electronics to flash the light and to smooth out the electrical pickup, you could hide those in a container or trailer.

Let us know what you find and end up doing.

-- Ernest

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RRVRR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jan 2017 at 11:40am
OK, here is what I found and remember of the rules from prototype DB EOD markers Germany

In Germany is to distinguish between day and night signs of the Signal Zg2. The allowed end of train markings for day time are the following:

  • one red/white or red/yellow sign (see pictures below) or
  • two red/white or red/yellow signs or
  • the night sign.

As night signs the following is allowed:

  • one red light or two red lights or
  • one reflecting version of the day sign or
  • two reflecting versions of the day sign

the night sign with a red light is allowed to flash. The used light bulbs have to be white only to glass/plastic that covers the front is colored and make the white light a red one. On new cars red LED's are allowed as well.

This leaves it pretty much open.

Here are some pictures

left - Day signs
right - night signs


Prototype Day (container car)



Prototype Night



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RRVRR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jan 2017 at 12:08pm
Originally posted by Railwriter Railwriter wrote:

I have an American made flashing end of train light that I bought when a local hobby shop closed down.  I no longer have the packaging, so I don't remember who makes it

Those are probably from Ring Engineering # EOT-36-R or # EOT-33-R what is a truck with power pickup and an EOD mounted on a Kaddee Coupler. I use those on three of my US Freight cars.
(Search Ebay with those numbers)

Evans Design # N3VFRED has one with a coin cell battery

For the German trains, Tams Elektronik has a need set that fits TT and HO (unfortunately nothing for N)
Here is a Link to the product
http://tams-online.de/epages/642f1858-c39b-4b7d-af86-f6a1feaca0e4.sf/de_DE/?ObjectPath=/Shops/642f1858-c39b-4b7d-af86-f6a1feaca0e4/Products/53-00180-02

Also look for ESU 50708, this is a product made for HO/TT/N but I thing it might be a little bit big for N-Scale
It's pretty cool.


The other thing is DIY with a function decoder, capacitor for stabilization and power pickups on the wheels.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote el Gato Gordo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jan 2017 at 2:15pm
Thanks, guys!  That's what I needed to know.  The photos were especially helpful.

Cheers!
Gordon
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Railwriter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jan 2017 at 2:17pm
The American end of train flashing light that I have came with a connector for a 9 volt battery.  It did not have a truck with electrical pickup.  Just wanted to note that.

Considering how little power one small LED draws, a single 9v battery should last a long, long time.

By the way, I also have a couple of Roco passenger car interior light kits 


that I bought a long time ago and have not yet installed.  These also allow various zones within a car to lit or turned off digitally.  

The kit has a socket for a Plux16 decoder, which is required for the digital operation.  However, the lights will also work without a decoder, in which case all of the lights are on all of the time.

These functions are nice, but putting a decoder in each passenger car can get expensive really quickly.

However, my thought is to wire the ESU tail lights into one of the function outputs of the Roco kit.

One of the reasons I have not installed the kits so far is that this requires soldering and both of the soldering irons that I have are large and clumsy to use with a cord.  I just bought a small battery operated cordless soldering iron that is specifically intended for small electronic work -- and which should work well for these types of projects.

I do have several passenger cars -- enough to make one train -- that I bought used with lights already installed.


Now back to my current structure kit project.

-- Ernest

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RRVRR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jan 2017 at 3:20pm
The best way to solder electronics is a digital soldering station, there is quite a variaty available ranging from $30-$400. My old one died a few years ago in the middle of a project so I run to radio shack and bought this one.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Radio-Shack-64-053-Digital-soldering-Station-/322209987035?hash=item4b053639db:g:pt8AAOSwTZ1Xm~Zz

It worked so far for me but i need to upgrade to one for SMD with additional hot air.
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