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Simple Bavarian Branch Line - Early 1900's

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Bahner View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bahner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jul 2017 at 6:26pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

Check out some images of hillsides and cliffs. Foam is very easy to carve and shape with knives or a stiff wire brush (good for doing slate or other strata). Take your time and practice on scraps outdoors.


Good advice, thanks. I've reviewed a number of good online videos and I'm trying out a blend of the various methods.


Ralph.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bahner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2017 at 8:12pm
Left hillside landscape with rural house 95% finished:




Closeup of the rural house (circa 1970 Kibri 'Berghauser', kit Bergdorf N 7005):



Rather odd that my iPhone thinks that grey is 'the new blue' :). I had to flatten off the hilltop since that's as high as I can go without having a removable mountain top.

I'll have to wait a bit to finish off the right hillside as I'm waiting for some back ordered items to be sent my way. In the meantime, I'll finish off the ramps.

Ralph.

Edited by Bahner - 14 Aug 2017 at 12:01am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote el Gato Gordo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 9:27am
Looking good!  The cliffs came out well, and Berghaus means "mountain house," so very appropriate!  If you ever want to lighten up the rockface a little, white powder tempera paints make a cheap & good weathering powder.  Dab on lightly and brush off.

Have you ever seen rock faces that have chain link draped over them to prevent rocks from dropping into a roadway or onto tracks?  I've seen that replicated using nylon mesh from the fabric store.  It can either be painted or simply bought in a grayish silver.
Cheers!
Gordon
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bahner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 11:38am
Thanks for the ideas' Gordon! I hit the rock faces with a bit of white acrylic (using the 'dry brush'method), but the iPhone camera just isn't picking it up properly or showing the true colors (likely has to do with my garage lighting).

Once I'm further along I'll take some pics using natural light.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote el Gato Gordo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 12:12pm
I forgot the Era you are modeling.   The chain link fence idea would not fit that period. Guess I'll have to use it myself.
Cheers!
Gordon
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bahner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 6:17pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

I forgot the Era you are modeling.   The chain link fence idea would not fit that period. Guess I'll have to use it myself.


I think in this era they just had someone on the train yell, "Achtung! Fallende Steine!" ;)

Edited by Bahner - 13 Aug 2017 at 6:18pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote el Gato Gordo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 7:30pm
This is Germany. It wouldn't take many stones before they built a shed roof over threatened sections of track to prevent stones from derailing the trains.
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Gordon
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Railwriter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 9:44pm
In all eras, up to the present, railroads have also built rock-slide/avalanche protection barriers from timbers.  These generally consist of two or more heavy vertical timbers driven into the ground, some angled braces on the downhill side and horizontal timbers between the vertical posts.  (I hope that makes sense.)

The Austrian Railways used to have (and presumably still do have) a job classification of "Bergsteiger" (mountain climber).  These maintenance people climbed the rock walls above the tracks and tunnels to knock down any loose rocks.  I don't think this was/is a full-time job and that these people did other types of maintenance work when not climbing.  But, presumably it was/is an extra pay category for more hazardous work.

I know Preiser has some mountain climber figures!

-- Ernest

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bahner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 11:48pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

This is Germany. It wouldn't take many stones before they built a shed roof over threatened sections of track to prevent stones from derailing the trains.


Yes, that's true of course :)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bahner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 11:58pm
Originally posted by Railwriter Railwriter wrote:

In all eras, up to the present, railroads have also built rock-slide/avalanche protection barriers from timbers.  These generally consist of two or more heavy vertical timbers driven into the ground, some angled braces on the downhill side and horizontal timbers between the vertical posts.  (I hope that makes sense.)

The Austrian Railways used to have (and presumably still do have) a job classification of "Bergsteiger" (mountain climber).  These maintenance people climbed the rock walls above the tracks and tunnels to knock down any loose rocks.  I don't think this was/is a full-time job and that these people did other types of maintenance work when not climbing.  But, presumably it was/is an extra pay category for more hazardous work. I know Preiser has some mountain climber figures!


Interesting info and I'll need to look around the web to see if I can find an example of the timber barrier construction. One benefit of building a proper model railroad is that it really does make one think about how the real thing is built and functions.

Hmmm, that would be a nice touch to have a climber up on the rock face. Now I just need to find the proper figure in N-scale.

Thanks,

Ralph.

Edited by Bahner - 14 Aug 2017 at 12:00am
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