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Simple Bavarian Branch Line - Early 1900's

Printed From: Reynauld's
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Forum Name: Layout Showcase
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URL: http://forum.reynaulds.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=1224
Printed Date: 20 Nov 2017 at 7:33am
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Topic: Simple Bavarian Branch Line - Early 1900's
Posted By: Bahner
Subject: Simple Bavarian Branch Line - Early 1900's
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 12:57am
This is my first attempt at a simple model railway. I've been inspired by many of the awesome builds on here!

Long story short, I recently inherited a few boxes of N scale locs, cars, parts, structures, etc. from a late 60's/early 70s build that unfortunately didn't make it past the initial track laying stage. About 90% is Arnold-Rapido and the rest Minitrix. Very little track survived, but I do have a small amount of Minitrix so that is what I went with for this project.

A Bavarian branch line (aka 'Lokalbahn') seemed appropriate as I used to live near the Bavarian Alps in the late 70's/early 80's and I fondly remember the many scenic train rides. Looking through some of the old booklets and manuals I had acquired, I found a simple Arnold Rapido layout that encompased many of the typical features that I associate with model railroads (mountains/hills, bridges, tunnels, lakes), but without a great deal of complexity.



I then converted the basic Arnold-Rapido layout to Minitrix ('old school' protractor and a compass...found out later that there are computer programs for this):



One of the unbuilt kits I have is a circa 1970s Kibri Alpine Village kit N7005. This was perfect fit for this layout, but the quality of the parts was a bit rough. However, a bit of tweaking/painting/aging and the village has 'come to life', so to speak:



For the station, I assembled/aged a Faller 'Stugl-Stuhls' laser-cut kit # 212120 (still needs a bit of touch-up):



All main buildings will be lit as well as the passenger cars (wherever possible).

For running stock I'll be using K.Bay.Sts.B locs. So far I've aquired an old PtL 2/2 'Glaskasten' (Minitrix # 12017, released in 1989) that I've managed to overhaul into good working order and a GTL 4/4 (Fleischmann # 7819) which was part of a Fleischmann # 7889 loc/freight set.





I'm also awaiting the delivery of the 2016 Minitrix # 11632 (I'm anticipating a long wait).

As far as the build goes, it's going to be a bit longer than the Arnold original to allow for longer runs (45" x 32"). I'm using 1/2" good grade plywood with a top grade 1/4" plywood laminated together. The raised roadbed was created from the 1/4" top piece (before lamination). The risers are 2 degree and 3 degree foam from Woodland Scenics. Cork from Busch was used under the rails. Currently, I am at the ballasting stage, so I'll take some pics once this stage is complete.

Thanks for looking :)

Ralph.



Replies:
Posted By: BR42
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 6:54am
Hello Ralph:

Looks very nice. The Arnold plan was designed in the 60's, and is very good for its age.  Since then some new ideas have developed as far as layout design, namely having a more realistic arrangement of the station tracks, and some hidden storage tracks.  Therefore, I would suggest the following minor modification to the plan that would enhance the "play"-value of the layout:

I would perhaps modify the plan slightly by moving the stub track in front of the station building and connect instead both tracks at the platform to the mainline.   This would give you a place to park a couple of closed freight cars to be loaded/unloaded at the freight house of the station.

I also would add one more stub-track on the opposite side to the station, namely a team track holding three to four cars with a ramp at the end.  These small stations saw lots of freight traffic about 80 years ago.  These two modifications would give you more action in case you get tired having your trains just run around the layout.

Finally, I would put at least one hidden track into the tunnel so that you can park a train while another circles the layout. If you have the space, I would add two, model trains are addictive, so you may want to run more, e.g. a passenger train in each direction and a local freight train.  It give the railroad a feeling of going somewhere if it is empty while your train circles the layout.

Ulrich


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 7:45am
Sounds like a good plan, Ralph.   The trouble with posting a track plan is that everybody and his brother will have helpful suggestions.

As Ulrich mentioned, this is addictive. I started with a simple oval on the dining room table. So my suggestion, looking at your drawing, is to add a turnout in the upper left and lower left corners. Then if you ever want to expand the layout, you can easily add on to the left side.

I like the plan you have outlined and it looks like a fun build, The church looks like one that is in Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland.

Glad to have another N scaler aboard!

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 11:37am
Really great suggestions, thanks! And yes, I can see how this gets to be addictive (dreaming up new layouts and landscapes, scratch building unique structures, etc.)

My goal here is to use this build to develop the basic skills required for a properly functional and realistic layout, so I plan to stay true to the original track layout. Considering the small layout size, I'm attempting to keep track and building structures to a minimum, while having as much scenic space as possible. I think this will work best to have a more realistic layout, considering the space limitations.

The build after this one will be more ambitious and incorporate more modern/sophisticated design elements.

The Kirbi church is modelled after the Swiss alpine church in Sertig-Doerfli:



And I just noticed that the 2 story house to the church's right is the same one in the Kibri kit containing the church.

Thanks again for the ideas!

Ralph.


Posted By: RRVRR
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 1:46pm
The main important fact is that you have fun in doing what you like, we love to see pictures as it develops.


-------------
best, Markus


http://forum.reynaulds.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=901&title=rhine-river-valley-railroad-ho" rel="nofollow - my layout - click here


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 1:59pm
Originally posted by RRVRR RRVRR wrote:

The main important fact is that you have fun in doing what you like, we love to see pictures as it develops.


Absolutely   

Here's where I am with this:



Started to ballast the longest section...

A shot of both viaducts:



Detail of my tallest running stock going through the bottom viaduct:



Getting this to function properly required the most effort so far. I had to cut and refit the central opening of this Kibri kit quite a bit higher than the other two openings for clearance and the track and turnout had to be repositioned at just the right angle to allow the locs/cars to get through without scraping (still only ~.040" clearance). One unfortunate side effect was that I had to extend the track all the way to the edge of the baseboard.

Ralph.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 2:05pm
Great progress!  The viaducts are an excellent addition - did you do weathering on those?

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 2:39pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:


Great progress!  The viaducts are an excellent addition - did you do weathering on those?


Thank you! Yes, these are the Kibri # 37660 'Straight Stone Viaducts' and they come in a uniform light grey color. They needed some work to get them looking a bit more realistic. I also added some 1/8" platforms on the bottom to get the added height I needed. It seems that this particular viaduct kit (and I'd guess most others, as well) wasn't originally intended for the purpose of running a train through them.


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 3:28pm
A couple of the boxed locs I inherited:







None of these had been run on a proper layout, only a test oval. So, I ran these on my layout as a test and they all run very strong. Not sure why the Southern Pacific is in there (hmmm, excuse for a new USA build, perhaps?)    

Ralph.



Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 5:59pm
Southern Pacific?   Build bridges, not walls. .....

Looks like a nice selection. Now for an E17 and some catenary.

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 12 Feb 2017 at 6:59pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

Southern Pacific?   Build bridges, not walls. .....

Looks like a nice selection. Now for an E17 and some catenary.


A bit of an eclectic selection, but there it is...

Still learning, but the 'E17' would refer to the old long boiler steam loc from New South Wales, correct?

And ever since I obtained the 3-axle 'Freilassig - Berchtesgaden' passenger wagons I've been eying the electric loc that used to pull them, so a build with catenary may well be in the cards


Posted By: BR42
Date Posted: 13 Feb 2017 at 6:29am
Hallo Ralph:

Looks nice.   The E 17 is a Germany electric loco built in the late 20s for express trains.  On a branch line like this, probably an E44.5 would be more appropriate.  Roco made a nice model.  The E 17 would pull longer coaches with boggies and four axles.  Such cars appeared after WWII on branch lines, but to run them, you may have to check the clearances on the viaduct.  The inside and outside overhang of longer cars may cause them to bump into it in a curve.   Same with catenary mast.  They need to be set in such a way that the longest cars and biggest engines will clear them.

Ulrich


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 13 Feb 2017 at 7:12am
I was just pulling the E17 out of my hat,trying for an earlier period E-Lok. Someone at a train show gave me a box of very nice German N scale rolling stock and an Arnold E17 was in there.   Leif installed a decoder and it runs very well!

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 13 Feb 2017 at 9:14am
I see, 'E17' where presumably the 'E' stands for 'elektrische'.

Arnold-Rapido used to proudly advertise that they could run two trains on the same track, one drawing power through the rails and the other via the catenary. Big thing back in the day, but from what I've read running multiple trains on the same line nowadays is easy with DCC.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 13 Feb 2017 at 9:32am
Running two or more trains on the same track IS easy with DCC.  The only limitation is one's ability to pay attention.....  I do it from time to time, mostly when running my track cleaning train, but never at Shows because I am too often distracted by spectator's questions.

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 13 Feb 2017 at 12:02pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:


Running two or more trains on the same track IS easy with DCC.  The only limitation is one's ability to pay attention.....  I do it from time to time, mostly when running my track cleaning train, but never at Shows because I am too often distracted by spectator's questions.


I can see where distraction would be a problem. Just thinking out loud, but shouldn't it be possible for the trains to sense each other and either keep a pre-set, or a minimum, safe distance? Kind of like the route new cars are going these days with 'adaptive cruise control'.

EDIT: Found a thread 'Topic: Train Detection':

The most effective method is to use a detection circuit, especially if you run your trains digitally. The drawback are the costs, namely a sensor is needed for each detection section, and some form of board to interpret the information. Sometimes these are combined, but then the amount of wiring may increase, e.g. if you use a board with 16 sections like the BD-16 from Digitrax. However, if you plan to use software to run your trains, that is about the best way to do it.


Posted By: RRVRR
Date Posted: 13 Feb 2017 at 3:13pm
Really good job on weathering those plastic bridges Clap


-------------
best, Markus


http://forum.reynaulds.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=901&title=rhine-river-valley-railroad-ho" rel="nofollow - my layout - click here


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 13 Feb 2017 at 5:27pm
Originally posted by RRVRR RRVRR wrote:

Really good job on weathering those plastic bridges Clap


Thanks! I think I went a bit over-the-top with the different paint colors, but it was a lot of fun

The little structures...not so easy and still touching up here and there attempting to to age them properly.


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 25 Jun 2017 at 11:41pm
Here's where I am so far:

In order to have this layout fit under a bed, as well as travel securely, a simple box was needed (but there is a twist, take note of the (7) brass bolts):



Top removed:



Top now positioned underneath the box with 'risers' made from an old broom handle threaded onto the brass bolts:



...which then raises the floating layout platform to the top level of the box:



A reversal of the process and it's all boxed up again.

Took a bit of work, but all trains now run perfectly with no derailments in either direction and all switches cleared of any loose ballast. Just started on the foam base of a mountain today, so at least it's moving along :)


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 26 Jun 2017 at 7:11am
That's ingenious! By the way, I have a pile of small freight cars which strangers have given me. Would you care to have a few, gratis? My interest is modern passenger service, so I have no use for them.

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 26 Jun 2017 at 10:27am
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

That's ingenious! By the way, I have a pile of small freight cars which strangers have given me. Would you care to have a few, gratis? My interest is modern passenger service, so I have no use for them.


Thank you very much for the offer, Gordon! From the historical data that I've been reading, in the late 1800's/early 1900's the freight cars used by the different German railroads were often quite similar (commonly borrowed, too), so any small German freight cars of the period would would be appropriate for this K.Bay.Sts.B. railroad layout.

Ralph -


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 26 Jun 2017 at 8:34pm
Here are the 4 I am planning to send.  The two on the left are Italian made, Lima; the two on the right are Fleischmann.


Feel free to use, repaint, or gift to another, if they don't suit your modeling goals.  I'll send via USPS in a day or two.  

People inherit or otherwise unintentionally acquire model railroad stuff.  The ones with German things come up to me at train shows and just give me cars, engines, whatever.  One fellow gave me a box with about $800 worth of cars and engines, all in original boxes!  I am glad to pass these on to someone who will enjoy them.


-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 27 Jun 2017 at 12:43am
Those look great! I'm curious to see the Lima cars as I'm unfamiliar with them.
Thanks, Gordon, and let me know the shipping cost.

Wow, $800 worth of train stuff is nothing to sneeze at!


Ralph -


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 01 Jul 2017 at 8:35pm
The cars just arrived in great shape! Thanks again, Gordon.

Today I took stock of what I have and what I might need to complete this simple layout. In addition to the six buildings that I built a while back, I've decided to use two alpine type buildings that my father had built in the early '70s (they just need a bit of finishing). This means I'm now set for buildings. I took a photo from the top down showing proposed building placement and added some crude pathways and a stream in MS Paint:



The two rear-most buildings will be on hills so they'll look down on the valley below.

Looking forward to seeing these eight buildings all lit up!

Ralph -


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 05 Jul 2017 at 6:48pm
Made some progress over the 4th :)

Rough formed what will be the 'mountain' and associated tunnels out of high-density foam. By keeping the foam fairly close to the track bed, I'm making sure that the rolling stock can't fall down the few inches to the base board and get damaged:







In order to get into the structure when a derail occurs, I created a wide opening:





Because the box interior dimension I have to work with is only 5-1/2", I'm going to have to get creative with placement of the mountain's buildings and trees.

Now it's on to the other mountain side :)

Ralph -


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 05 Jul 2017 at 7:03pm
Looking good, Ralph!   A little concerned about clearance for any longer cars you might run. The inside radius may not clear the middle of a longer car - there were some at the turn of the century.

Now for a palm sander, 60 grit paper, and a Shop Vac.

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 05 Jul 2017 at 8:17pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

Looking good, Ralph!   A little concerned about clearance for any longer cars you might run. The inside radius may not clear the middle of a longer car - there were some at the turn of the century.

Now for a palm sander, 60 grit paper, and a Shop Vac.


Thanks, Gordon. Thanks for the heads-up on the longer cars. I plan to run just the shorter ones since it'll seem more in scale with the small size of the layout.

I just ordered some interesting accessory items from Reynaulds that I think will add some quaint charm to the rural landscape :)

Ralph.


Posted By: BR42
Date Posted: 14 Jul 2017 at 10:07am
Ralph:

Looks good.  With the tunnel in place the station tracks make much more sense and look more realistic.  Great job.

Ulrich


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 18 Jul 2017 at 11:45pm
Thanks, Ulrich! First attempt at this, so who knows how this is going to turn out :)

Finished all the foam construction except for some foam I plan to lay down later in the interior to add some contour and depth to the layout:



Both of the upper mountain tunnels have removable pieces that provide access from the back, but since the small left/bottom tunnel is so short I just left this as one solid construction. Fitted a few portals today and started to work the foam to get a feel for how to work in contours and textures. Finally starting to look like something! :)


Ralph.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 19 Jul 2017 at 5:18pm
Check out some images of hillsides and cliffs. Foam is very easy to carve and shape with knives or a stiff wire brush (good for doing slate or other strata). Take your time and practice on scraps outdoors.

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 19 Jul 2017 at 6:26pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

Check out some images of hillsides and cliffs. Foam is very easy to carve and shape with knives or a stiff wire brush (good for doing slate or other strata). Take your time and practice on scraps outdoors.


Good advice, thanks. I've reviewed a number of good online videos and I'm trying out a blend of the various methods.


Ralph.


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 12 Aug 2017 at 8:12pm
Left hillside landscape with rural house 95% finished:




Closeup of the rural house (circa 1970 Kibri 'Berghauser', kit Bergdorf N 7005):



Rather odd that my iPhone thinks that grey is 'the new blue' :). I had to flatten off the hilltop since that's as high as I can go without having a removable mountain top.

I'll have to wait a bit to finish off the right hillside as I'm waiting for some back ordered items to be sent my way. In the meantime, I'll finish off the ramps.

Ralph.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 9:27am
Looking good!  The cliffs came out well, and Berghaus means "mountain house," so very appropriate!  If you ever want to lighten up the rockface a little, white powder tempera paints make a cheap & good weathering powder.  Dab on lightly and brush off.

Have you ever seen rock faces that have chain link draped over them to prevent rocks from dropping into a roadway or onto tracks?  I've seen that replicated using nylon mesh from the fabric store.  It can either be painted or simply bought in a grayish silver.


-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 11:38am
Thanks for the ideas' Gordon! I hit the rock faces with a bit of white acrylic (using the 'dry brush'method), but the iPhone camera just isn't picking it up properly or showing the true colors (likely has to do with my garage lighting).

Once I'm further along I'll take some pics using natural light.


Ralph.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 12:12pm
I forgot the Era you are modeling.   The chain link fence idea would not fit that period. Guess I'll have to use it myself.

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 6:17pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

I forgot the Era you are modeling.   The chain link fence idea would not fit that period. Guess I'll have to use it myself.


I think in this era they just had someone on the train yell, "Achtung! Fallende Steine!" ;)


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 7:30pm
This is Germany. It wouldn't take many stones before they built a shed roof over threatened sections of track to prevent stones from derailing the trains.

-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Railwriter
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 9:44pm
In all eras, up to the present, railroads have also built rock-slide/avalanche protection barriers from timbers.  These generally consist of two or more heavy vertical timbers driven into the ground, some angled braces on the downhill side and horizontal timbers between the vertical posts.  (I hope that makes sense.)

The Austrian Railways used to have (and presumably still do have) a job classification of "Bergsteiger" (mountain climber).  These maintenance people climbed the rock walls above the tracks and tunnels to knock down any loose rocks.  I don't think this was/is a full-time job and that these people did other types of maintenance work when not climbing.  But, presumably it was/is an extra pay category for more hazardous work.

I know Preiser has some mountain climber figures!

-- Ernest



Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 11:48pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

This is Germany. It wouldn't take many stones before they built a shed roof over threatened sections of track to prevent stones from derailing the trains.


Yes, that's true of course :)


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2017 at 11:58pm
Originally posted by Railwriter Railwriter wrote:

In all eras, up to the present, railroads have also built rock-slide/avalanche protection barriers from timbers.  These generally consist of two or more heavy vertical timbers driven into the ground, some angled braces on the downhill side and horizontal timbers between the vertical posts.  (I hope that makes sense.)

The Austrian Railways used to have (and presumably still do have) a job classification of "Bergsteiger" (mountain climber).  These maintenance people climbed the rock walls above the tracks and tunnels to knock down any loose rocks.  I don't think this was/is a full-time job and that these people did other types of maintenance work when not climbing.  But, presumably it was/is an extra pay category for more hazardous work. I know Preiser has some mountain climber figures!


Interesting info and I'll need to look around the web to see if I can find an example of the timber barrier construction. One benefit of building a proper model railroad is that it really does make one think about how the real thing is built and functions.

Hmmm, that would be a nice touch to have a climber up on the rock face. Now I just need to find the proper figure in N-scale.

Thanks,

Ralph.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 14 Aug 2017 at 8:27am
Try looking at some Führerstandmitfahrt videos, like this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZuHjIkevig" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZuHjIkevig

The driver's cab view provides some interesting trackside detail.  I don't know if this particular vid shows any snow or rock sheds, but it will give you an "in" to this family of videos.




-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 14 Aug 2017 at 11:00am
Thanks, Gordon. That's great footage with lots of track side details.

Ralph.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 15 Aug 2017 at 9:59am
There are a lot of Führerstandmitfahrts out there.  Signals and trackside equipment will be different than your era, but other scenery not much changed.

As far as the avalanche shed, this is what we are talking about:



Although most are concrete these days:


Talk again next week.  I'm off on vacation to a place where there are no comms - no internet, no cell service, nothing.




-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 15 Aug 2017 at 10:27am
Thanks, now I see what you all mean.

Have a good vacation, Gordon.



Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 22 Aug 2017 at 9:57pm
Moving right along...





Here I had to do something with the DC connectors:



...so, a foam rock aggregate does the trick:



And, lastly, the small train station:



All buildings have lighting installed. Lots more landscaping to do

Ralph.


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 19 Sep 2017 at 10:31am
Greening of the landscape:






Train station:




Stream:







Posted By: BR42
Date Posted: 19 Sep 2017 at 4:00pm
Ralph:

Looks nice, congratulations for making great progress.

Ulrich


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 19 Sep 2017 at 4:26pm
Originally posted by BR42 BR42 wrote:

Ralph:

Looks nice, congratulations for making great progress.

Ulrich


Thank you, Ulrich. Being new to model railroads (and miniature modeling in general), the start was a bit of a head scratcher. But I'm enjoying this a lot more now that I have a better understanding of the process.

In a few weeks I should at the final stage of fixing minor damage, pathways, mounting figures, tree placement, etc.


Ralph.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 20 Sep 2017 at 7:57pm
Very good, Ralph!  That church reminds me of the one in Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland:

https://www.dropbox.com/preview/Europe%202014/2014-08-12%2007.48.43.jpg 

The stone viaduct also is particularly well done.  Now all you need is an Alpine background....  And to finish the pink rock candy mountain.



-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 20 Sep 2017 at 11:49pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

Very good, Ralph!  That church reminds me of the one in Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland:

https://www.dropbox.com/preview/Europe%202014/2014-08-12%2007.48.43.jpg 

The stone viaduct also is particularly well done.  Now all you need is an Alpine background....  And to finish the pink rock candy mountain.



Thanks, Gordon. Yes, it does resemble the one in Lauterbrunnen, but it's actually the one in the town of Sertig-Dorfi in Switzerland (it took me a good amount of web surfing to find this one!):





Unfortunately, I have to remove the church's tower section since it sits too high on my layout when I close the box lid. I added magnets to both the church and the inside of the tower so that it holds together when reassembled.

Finished off the last tunnel portals today and have started to work on the last 'Pink Candy Mountain' to carve out the locations for a charming little Alpine Chapel ('St. Berhard's Chapel/Faller # 232239) and a small hunting lodge (as tiny as the chappel is, I just managed to squeeze a small light inside):



Can't wait to get started on all the detail work and then finally get the trains running again!

Ralph.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 21 Sep 2017 at 10:40am
Good idea with the magnets!

Now that I finished the salt mine, I finally rejoined the yard section to the main layout.  This will let me "test" (read: play with) more trains in prep for the next show near the end of October.

I may have to borrow your magnet idea for some of the buildings on the extension. I currently have blocks of 1/2" blue foam holding them in place, but the addition of magnets would make them more secure.


-------------
Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 21 Sep 2017 at 1:48pm
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

Good idea with the magnets!

Now that I finished the salt mine, I finally rejoined the yard section to the main layout.  This will let me "test" (read: play with) more trains in prep for the next show near the end of October.

I may have to borrow your magnet idea for some of the buildings on the extension. I currently have blocks of 1/2" blue foam holding them in place, but the addition of magnets would make them more secure.


For my particular application, I 'borrowed' one of my wife's refrigerator magnets   


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 29 Sep 2017 at 12:00am
Finally, all 'Pink Candy Cane' HD foam has been covered up!

Little Faller St. Bernhard chapel:




Old 1970's Kirbi structure (looks like a hunting lodge to me):



These closeup pics are actually helpful as I can see some areas that need a bit of touch-up that i didn't catch with the naked eye.

Ralph.


Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 29 Sep 2017 at 9:58am
Looking good, Ralph!  I particularly like the flower beds lining the walk to the chapel, and the horns over the door of the cabin. 

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Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 29 Sep 2017 at 10:20am
Thanks, Gordon. Next up is a hay making kit from Faller and hopefully that will turn out well.

Ralph.


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 03 Oct 2017 at 9:05pm
Mak'in Hay:



Posted By: el Gato Gordo
Date Posted: 04 Oct 2017 at 7:57am
Okay, Ralph. Time to be a little more critical. If you Google Images of hay cutting by hand, you will see the cut hay in rows before being loaded onto the wagon.

I had the experience of watching the hand harvest of wheat and of hay in Germany in 1956. The men with scythes move through the uncut grass in echelon formation, very orderly. The women rake the cut grass into rows. After the hay has dried a day or two, it is forked into stacks or onto a wagon.

Pale green 2 to 3 mm static grass would make good cut hay.

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Cheers!
Gordon
Rheinland Bayern Bahn


Posted By: Bahner
Date Posted: 04 Oct 2017 at 9:27am
Originally posted by el Gato Gordo el Gato Gordo wrote:

Okay, Ralph. Time to be a little more critical. If you Google Images of hay cutting by hand, you will see the cut hay in rows before being loaded onto the wagon.

I had the experience of watching the hand harvest of wheat and of hay in Germany in 1956. The men with scythes move through the uncut grass in echelon formation, very orderly. The women rake the cut grass into rows. After the hay has dried a day or two, it is forked into stacks or onto a wagon.

Pale green 2 to 3 mm static grass would make good cut hay.


Hi Gordon,

Thanks for the input.

Not the best camera angle perhaps since contrast is lacking, but the hay is in rows and piled up in mounds (would be clearer with a top down shot). I think I went a bit overboard on the hay ground cover, though.

Basically, I went off of the Faller layout on their box, though I admit their's is cleaner looking which is something I can easily modify on my layout:



Ralph.



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